Satellite

District Considers Changes for 2019-’20 School Year

The+Administration+Building+is+the+site+of+the+N.J.S.D.+Board+of+Education+meeting+on+Tuesday.++The+agenda+features+three+proposals+for+the+2019-%2720+school+year.
Back to Article
Back to Article

District Considers Changes for 2019-’20 School Year

The Administration Building is the site of the N.J.S.D. Board of Education meeting on Tuesday.  The agenda features three proposals for the 2019-'20 school year.

The Administration Building is the site of the N.J.S.D. Board of Education meeting on Tuesday. The agenda features three proposals for the 2019-'20 school year.

The Administration Building is the site of the N.J.S.D. Board of Education meeting on Tuesday. The agenda features three proposals for the 2019-'20 school year.

The Administration Building is the site of the N.J.S.D. Board of Education meeting on Tuesday. The agenda features three proposals for the 2019-'20 school year.

Jason Fisher, Student of Journalism

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






The N.J.S.D. Board of Education will meet Tuesday at the Administration Building to discuss three proposals for the 2019-’20 school year.

Some of the proposals affecting NHS include a schoolwide implementation of target-based grading (TBG), a massive overhaul of class schedules, and safety improvements to the building.

Target-based grading

One of the most publicized proposals for next year is the addition of target-based grading, previously known as standards-based grading. The system has seen limited implementation in the school so far, and has proved controversial among students and staff.

“I think it’s something the school is doing for its image, to make more people graduate,” explained freshman Ashlyn Jacobs, whose speech and Spanish classes are using TBG. Jacobs further expressed frustration at a lack of feedback she is receiving from her teachers, and lamented that the system made it difficult to do well in advanced classes. This is because of the scores of 1, 2 and 3 being translated into letter grades as F, D and A respectively, which means that all scores must be perfect to pass.

Jacobs is not alone in her opposition to TBG. A recent poll, posted on the Satellite,  found that 74 percent of students oppose the planned full implementation of TBG next year as of publication date.

Some teachers, however, have spoken in favor of TBG. “I think it gives you a way to better measure student performance,”  history and economics teacher Andrew Laluzerne said.

Schedule overhaul

Word of an extensive overhaul of the daily schedule has spread across NHS. Assistant Principal Tim Kachur explained that the school may replace the current daily schedule with a block schedule. Under such a plan, the current layout of seven 50-minute classes per day would be replaced with four 90-minute classes per day, with classes meeting on alternating days. Kachur spoke in support of the proposal, saying that the plan would be “incredible” for NHS.

Kachur said that he had a chance to work with two other schools in the state.  “I’ve gotten amazing feedback from students, teachers, parents, and guidance counselors.”

The Glossary of Education Reform, compiled by the New England-based nonprofit Great Schools Partnership, has listed more innovative lesson plans, and a smaller burden on students and teachers among pros of block scheduling.

The plan, however, seems to have galvanized fierce opposition from students. Junior Logan Laabs has launched a change.org petition asking Principal Brian Wunderlich to cancel the plans. The petition has 174 signatures as of Nov. 9, and lists lack of continuity among classes and lack of scientific support among the reasons to oppose block scheduling.

Other plans

Other proposals for the 2019-’20 school year are the addition of new courses in computer science and graphic design, and ways to make school facilities more secure. The district received a $379,852 grant from the state Department of Justice in October, and part of the board meeting will be a discussion on how to use the money. Kachur explained that any major changes that passed would be decided by referendum next April.

“It’s up to you as students and teachers to give feedback, and we’ll improve as we need to,” Kachur said.

The school board meeting will be held Nov. 13 from 5 to 7 p.m. A final vote is expected Nov. 20.

 

Works Cited

“Block Schedule.” The Glossary of Education Reform, Great Schools Partnership, 2013.

“Board of Education Meeting Re Community Survey.” 410 S. Commercial St., Neenah, Wis.

Jacobs, Ashlyn. 9 Nov. 2018

Kachur, Tim. 9 Nov. 2018

Laabs, Logan. “Brian Wunderlich: Cancel next year’s block scheduling plan for Neenah High School.”

Laluzerne, Andrew. 9 Nov. 2018.

“Wisconsin Department of Justice.” School Safety Grants, Wisconsin Department of Justice, 24 July 2018, www.doj.state.wi.us/office-school-safety/school-safety-grants.

 

 

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
5 Comments

5 Responses to “District Considers Changes for 2019-’20 School Year”

  1. Esther Gauerke on November 19th, 2018 1:03 PM

    As a student in NHS, I am personally against the changes that want to be made for the 19-’20 school year. Target Based Grading has shown my grades lower than they usually are, and making me stress over my grades. I have parents who checks my grades and ask me if they are lower than usual. Going to the schedule, it is hard to change things that students have a routine of. I don’t agree with block schedules due to being confused on certain days, and possibly forgetting things that may be needed.

  2. Nathan Tatro on November 19th, 2018 1:04 PM

    I personally don’t think that target based grading is able to give enough feedback and doesn’t properly set your grade to where you are actually are at in knowledge of the curriculum. In one of my classes we had our first assignment that actually gave a grade and if you didn’t do very good on it, then you aren’t able to make it up or get a new grade in to improve it because there are very few assessments that actually matter for a grade and the next one isn’t for a while. I also oppose block scheduling. For some classes you may not like, you just want to get through them and if the classes are extra 30 minutes long you will lose all of you attention on the class and won’t learn. I also feel like having classes every other day you will forget what you learned in the last class, and therefore you will have to review at the beginning of class every day.

  3. Maddie Alft on November 19th, 2018 2:08 PM

    I think the school needs to be more concerned with how the students personally feel about the changes being made. I think there is too much of a focus on the studies that say certain things rather than a focus on the feelings of the students. Especially when there are many that are against the changes. It sends a message that the school doesn’t care about our feelings and the way that we see things, they are more focussed on appearing “up to date with the times” rather than adhering to how students are feeling.

  4. Jadyn Schroepfer on November 19th, 2018 6:02 PM

    Despite graduating at the end of the year, I believe the potential changes won’t positively contribute to student success. Having experienced target-based grading last year and this year, I can honestly say it truly hasn’t improved my grades. In fact, I received my lowest grade all throughout high school because of target-based grading. Also, block scheduling may actually impose opposite results. The new schedule could raise the amount of homework given in class due to the extension, which would increase stress and contribute to unsatisfactory grades.

  5. David Xiao on November 20th, 2018 12:45 PM

    I believe target based grading emphasizes the need to truly understand the topic rather than simply memorization. In the one class I’ve had TBG, it forced me to comprehensively learn the content and apply it continuously. Comparatively, I barely retain information I learned at the beginning of the year in many other classes, as I would only need the information for one test and could just quickly relearn it later. I believe that students have become accustomed to the simplicity of this system and only resist change. I completely believe that if you are studious and willing to learn, TBG should not present any obstacle at all.

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Left
  • District Considers Changes for 2019-’20 School Year

    News

    Food Drive: Orbit Restocked by Community

  • District Considers Changes for 2019-’20 School Year

    Classroom

    Three Students Qualify for National Merit Scholarship

  • District Considers Changes for 2019-’20 School Year

    Classroom

    Tapestry Adds Hmong Culture to NHS

  • District Considers Changes for 2019-’20 School Year

    Community

    Plans to Improve Safety Exist

  • District Considers Changes for 2019-’20 School Year

    News

    It Takes a Village to Host the Book Drive

  • District Considers Changes for 2019-’20 School Year

    Community

    Renovations Begin for Community Music & Arts Collaborative

  • District Considers Changes for 2019-’20 School Year

    News

    Coming Soon, Neenah Without Borders 2020 Launch

  • District Considers Changes for 2019-’20 School Year

    Extracurricular

    NHS One-Act Play Achieves State

  • District Considers Changes for 2019-’20 School Year

    News

    Lives Saved by Annual NHS Blood Drive

  • District Considers Changes for 2019-’20 School Year

    Classroom

    Physics Students Teach Others Through Haunted Physics Lab

Navigate Right
The student news site of Neenah High School
District Considers Changes for 2019-’20 School Year